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A Herculean Task

Mahmoud Jibril, who has been de-facto prime minister of the country since 23 March, when the National Transitional Council (NTC) …

Shrewd Successor

Cutting a distinctive figure, Salva Kiir resembles the gun-toting underdog of a cowboy flick. But aside from the rugged beard, …

Old Guard

Two days after Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak resigned on 11 February, the country’s Higher Council of the Armed Forces announced …

Rebel Judge

As civil war continues in Libya, calls for more military aid intensify from the anti-Qadhafi National Transitional Council. Leading the …

Offensive Charm

The scandal currently surrounding Dominique Strauss-Khan—or DSK, as he is commonly known—ranks amongst the most damaging in modern political history. It is easily in the same bracket as the Watergate scandal, which destroyed Richard Nixon’s presidency, and similar in tone to the philandering which spoiled Bill Clinton’s reputation. The crucial differences are in the genuinely monstrous specifics of the allegations at the center of the scandal, and the quite dull—but nonetheless weighty—ramifications upon global economics.

Partners in Crime

New information sourced from the notes of psychologist and Air Force retiree, Dr. Bruce Jessen, reveals for the first time that torture was not only used to obtain intelligence, but also to “exploit” detainees with the aim of collaboration. Significantly, this evidence sheds new light on the psychological aspects of the Bush administration’s torture program, and the two men responsible for designing it.